Class:angiosperms
Group:monocotyledons
Order:Asparagales
Family:Alliaceae
Genus:Allium
Scientific name: Allium mongolicum Turcz. ex Regel
Name acc. to:Gubanov 1996
Description:Bulbs several on horizontal distinct rhizome, with reddish-yellow coriaceous tunic split into parallel fibers at base; leaves semicylindrical, 0.5-1.5 mm broad, numerous, aggregated at scape base, shorter than scape; umbel 2.5-3 cm diam., hemispherical or subglobose, many-flowered; pedicels unequal, 1.5-2 times longer than perianth; lobes of broadly campanulate perianth pink, with dark nerve; filaments of inner stamens enlarged at base, undivided; style not exserted from perianth. (acc. to Friesen 1987/2001)
Link to Flora of China:http://www.efloras.org/browse.aspx?flora_id=2&name_str=Allium+mongolicum
open map in a new windowtaxon distribution for Allium mongolicum acc. to Geobotanical Regions of Mongolia by Grubov (1955)
Habitat:Desert, pebble, stony and sandy steppes, bels, debris, and stony deserts, sands and pebbles, stony and rocky slopes of mountains and hills, Haloxylon woodlands; edificator of desert steppes (Grubov 2001).

Character Data:

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Habit (i)general appearance of a plant
Growth form: (i)Herb, shrub or tree / water plant = terrestrialherb (i)herbaceous, erect plant, up to 2m high, mostly with a leafy shoot, if perennial, shoots die to the ground each season, shoots are not woody
example: Artemisia pectinata
inherited by family Alliaceae: herb
perennial (i)living for several to many years, as opposed to annual and biennial
acc. to: FoC online
Smell & Touch: (i)general appearance of the plantodor (i)plant with an obvious scent inherited by family Alliaceae: odor
Parasite Status: (i)Is the plant autonoumously living, or a half- or full parasite?no parasite (i)plant fully autonomous
example: Ranunculus
inherited by family Alliaceae: no parasite
Water or terrestrial plant: (i)water and swamp plantsterrestrial (i)plant grows on dry land
example: Orostachys spinosa
inherited by family Alliaceae: terrestrial
Fruit (i)the seed bearing organ, with or without adnate parts; a ripened ovary and any other structures which are attached and ripen with it. Aggregate fruits are handled like simple fruits for determination.
Consistency: (i)Fleshy fruits or dry fruits, see dispersal adaptations for further classificationdry (i)with a dry outer shell, no fleshy parts, but seed (embryo) could be edible inherited by family Alliaceae: dry
Opening of Fruit:opening along dehiscense line (i)opening along a preformed line
example: Vicia, Lathyrus: pods
inherited by family Alliaceae: opening along dehiscense line
opening (i)dry? fruits opening with different types inherited by family Alliaceae: opening
Type of Fruit: (i)common fruit types (including pseudocarp!?)capsule delete image 1 ergänzen (i)dry dehiscent fruit, releasing seeds by slits or holes; ergänzen: verschiedene Kaspelfrüchte Öffn: Mohn und Cerastium Sonderfälle. einfache Capsel (iris, Allium, Juncus)
example: Poppy, Iris, Zygophyllum - common fruit type
inherited by family Alliaceae: capsule delete image 1 ergänzen
Size of fruit: (i)size of the fruit including appendices to 5 mm (i)
example: Halerpestes: many folicles forming dry nutlets
inherited by family Alliaceae:
from 5 mm to 10 mm (i)
example: Silene: small capsule opening with teeth
inherited by family Alliaceae:
Seed number: (i)estimate the number of seeds per fruit, if recognizable seeds are in the fruit (in rare cases a fruit may contain one seeded nuts: rose hip, carex)2-6 (i)2-6 single seeds, well recognizable
example: Crataegus: few-seeded berry
inherited by family Alliaceae: 2-6
Flower (i)reproductive portion of the plant, consisting of sepals, petals, stamens, and pistils
Flower Appearance and Pollination: (i)general appearance of the flowerattractive, animal-pollinated (i)attractive and coloured flowers, mostly large, attracting surely animals
example: Trollius, Rosa, Chamaerhodos
inherited by family Alliaceae: attractive, animal-pollinated
Perianth Arrangement: (i)Attention: in some plants, flowers may be dimorphic in different ways (dioecious or gynodioecious). If flowers vary, record the characters of the most showy flowers.simple, similar (i)only one type of perianth leaves (tepals)
example: Tulipa
inherited by family Alliaceae: simple, similar
Diameter of Flower: (i)diameter of flower or flower head to 5 mm (i)
example: Aruncus
inherited by family Alliaceae:
from 5 mm to 10 mm (i)
example: Stellaria
inherited by family Alliaceae:
Flower Symmetry: (i)Symmetry of the perianth leaves. Attention: to assess this character, look on sepals, petals and stamens, but neglect carpels and ovary.radiary, regular (actinomorphic) (i)more than two axis of symmetry
example: Saxifraga: 5; Iris: 3
inherited by family Alliaceae: radiary, regular (actinomorphic)
Flower Form: (i)common forms of flowerssimple (flat) - Do not confuse with inflorescences as in some Asteraceae (i)petals spread out, flower appearing flat
example: Mollugo, Trientalis, Pulsatilla, Saxifraga
inherited by family Alliaceae: simple (flat) - Do not confuse with inflorescences as in some Asteraceae
Sepal Number: (i)Number of sepal leaves (outer perianth leaves, calyx leaves, mostly greenish). Attention, this character applies only for flowers separated in speals and petals, thus excluding most monocots. Be aware of the bracts (involucral leaves) of Asteraceae flowerheads, do not qualify these as sepals! Be also aware in Rosaceae is often an epicalyx developed, in this case count all parts.none or rudimentary (i)hardly visible or absent, since perianth uniform
example: all monocots with uniform perianth, many Asteraceae and Apiaceae
inherited by family Alliaceae: none or rudimentary
Petal / Tepal Number: (i)Number of petal leaves (inner perianth leaves, usually coloured).6 (i)
example: Allium, Lilium, Dactylorhiza
inherited by family Alliaceae: 6 inherited by genus Allium: 6
Petal / Tepal Fusion: (i)To which degree are the petal leaves connected? Petals sympetalous.fused at base (i)petal leaves with a joint base, but fused over not more than 50% of the entire length
example: Myosotis, Pedicularis, Cortusa
inherited by family Alliaceae: fused at base
Spur: (i)a hollow, slender, sac-like appendage of the perianth leaves, storing nectarno spur (i)flower without appendage
example: Peganum
inherited by family Alliaceae: no spur
Stamen Number: (i)Attention: We ask for the reproductive organs of the flower dispersing pollen. Count only fully fertile stamens, not staminodia (e.g. Parnassia).6 (i)
example: Veratrum, Smelowskia, Juncus
inherited by family Alliaceae: 6
Stamen fusion: (i)To which degree are the stamens fused? Attention: Whereas the pollen sacs itself are often free, their stalks (filaments) may be fused. Here, we count them as fused if they are together over at least one thirth of their length.free (i)stamens with separate bases
example: Malus
inherited by family Alliaceae: free
fused with each other (i)all or most stamens fused with each other to a tube-like structure
example: Caragana, Petasites
inherited by family Alliaceae: fused with each other
Pistil number now: also carpell number!?: (i)number of pistils (female floral organs: style, if developed; stigma; and carpels/ovary)1 (i)one carpel, but clearly one stigma
example: Pyrola, Primula, Alyssum
inherited by family Alliaceae: 1
3 (i)three stigmas, usually in a triangle
example: Stellaria, Euphorbia, Campanula, Allium
inherited by genus Allium: 3
Carpel fusion: (i)to which degree are the carpels (modified leaf forming simple pistil or part of a compound pistil) fuseedfused (i)carpels united into an ovary, only styles are free
example: Malus, Berberis
inherited by family Alliaceae: fused
Style number: (i)Portion of the pistil connecting the stigma to the ovary1 inherited by family Alliaceae: 1
Ovary position: (i)for entirely or partly fused carpels, describe their position in relation to the insertion point of perianth leaves (best done by doing a longitudinal section of a flower)superior (hypogynous) (i)base of carpels attached above insertion point of perianth leaves, carpels free or fused
example: Delphinium, Anemone
inherited by family Alliaceae: superior (hypogynous)
Sex: (i)Distribution of sexes among flowers, only cases most commonly occurringbisexual, hermaphrodite (i)all or nearly all flowers of a plant with male and female parts
example: Haplophyllum, Chenopodium
inherited by family Alliaceae: bisexual, hermaphrodite
Inflorescence (i)flowering part of a plant, describes the arrangement of the flowers on the flowering axis
Inflorescence: (i)Structure of the inflorescenceFlowers in inflorescence (i)no solitary flowers inherited by family Alliaceae: Flowers in inflorescence
Simple inflorescences (i)flowers on short to long side shoots (second order) branching from a main shoot
example: Polygonum bistorta
inherited by family Alliaceae: Simple inflorescences
Appearance: (i)outer look of the inflorescenceterminal (i)inflorescence is the highest point of the plant and may consist of a single flower only
example: Cypripedium, Rhaponticum, Ligularia sibirica, Echinops
inherited by family Alliaceae: terminal
Inflorescence Type: (i)Types of inflorescence. Attention: We here ask for the botanical nomenclature of inflorescences, which is sufficiently complicated. Tick only, if you are certain, or tick all inflorescence types that appear similar of these of the plant in question.umbel (i)flowers on short to long, leafless stalks emerging from one point
example: Allium
inherited by family Alliaceae: umbel
Leaf (i)expanded, usually photosynthetic organ of a plant (including phylloclades)
Leaf Veination: (i)arrangment of the main veins of a leafparallel (i)most veins arranged parallel to the leaf, no pronounced main vein (usually in elongate to linear leaves)
example: Plantago, Veratrum
inherited by order Asparagales: parallel
Leaf Arrangement: (i)arrangement of leaves at the stembasal rosette (i)leaves positioned at the base of the stem, stem often without leaves, no visible internodes (but flowers often on erect stems, and these may have few leaves)
example: Limonium, Potentilla, Plantago; also used in Liliales with basaly crouwded leaves (Tofieldia, Zygadenus etc.)
inherited by family Alliaceae: basal rosette
Shape of Leaves: (i)General shape of leaf or leaflet in compound leaves. Always check the ground for largest leaves of a plant. To be worked out: how to handle pinnate leaves?linear including grasslike leaves (i)leaves more than five times longer than broad with more or less parallel margins; see character: stipule for ligula
example: Dracocephalum ruyischianum, Poaceae
inherited by family Alliaceae: linear including grasslike leaves
filiform (i)leaves thread-like, at least more than ten times longer than broad
example: Potamogeton pectinatus, P. filiformis
inherited by family Alliaceae: filiform
Division of Leaves: (i)Blade of the leaf entire or (more or less) deeply dissected. Attention: There are various appearances of the leaf margin (from entire to toothed and lobed). Here, we ignore this and ask only for dissections that separate the leaf for more than one third of its length or width, whatever is smaller. Sometimes, it is difficult to tell apart compound leaves from a shoot system with simple leaves: look for stipulae and/or axillary buds at the ground of the leaves: if only some possess these structures, the others are most likely leaflets of a compound leaf.simple (i)non-divided leaf, but margin may be incised nearly to the ground inherited by family Alliaceae: simple
Leaf Apex: (i)Appearance of the tip of leaf resp. leaflets in compound leaves.rounded (i)with a round apex
example: Trifolium
inherited by family Alliaceae: rounded
obtuse (i)sides coming together at the apex at an angle greater than 90 degrees
example: Fallopia convolvulus
inherited by family Alliaceae: obtuse
Leaf Margin: (i)Structure of leaf margin (or that of a leaflet in case of compound leaves). Attention: Here we ask for the leaf margin, defined as all those dissections that separate the leaf for less than one third of its length or width, whatever is smaller. To be worked out: how to handle margin of pinnate leaves?entire (i)smooth margin
example: Iris
inherited by family Alliaceae: entire
Petiole: (i)length of the leaf stalk (petiole) in relation to the leafwithout (i)leaves without petiole (stalk), sessile
example: Poaceae, Iris

Stipule: (i)leaflets at the base of the petiole, these are smaller and of different shapenone (i)without stipules
example: Euphorbia, Ericaceae s.l.
inherited by family Alliaceae: none
Leaf colour upper side: (i)Shades of green on the leaf, upper sidegreen (i)clear green
example: Tribulus terrestris
inherited by family Alliaceae: green
Leaf colour lower side: (i)Shades of green on the leaf, lower sidegreen (i)clear green, in most species
example: Angelica decurrens
inherited by family Alliaceae: green
Shoot/Stem (i)a young stem or branch
Spines, thorns or prickles: (i)shoot with conspicuous spines, thorns or pricklesabsent (i)stem glabrous or hairy, but never with spines, thornes or prickles
example: Gentiana barbata
inherited by family Alliaceae: absent
Root / shoot below ground (i)plant part below ground (in most cases), including below ground shoots, without leaves
Root type: (i)Organisation of the rootshomorhizous (i)many equal roots
example: Monocotyledonae
inherited by class: homorhizous
many equal roots (homorhizous or creeping rhizome) (i)monocotyledons and dicotyledons with creeping rhizomes and roots of nearly equal diameter
example: Stipa
inherited by family Alliaceae: many equal roots (homorhizous or creeping rhizome)
Storage in below-ground structures: (i)Rhizom oder Zwiebelbulbs with roots on lower side (i)leaves at the base of the plant form a bulb, containing one to many leaves
example: Lilium, Allium, Gagea
inherited by family Alliaceae: bulbs with roots on lower side inherited by genus Allium: bulbs with roots on lower side
Hairs
Hairs : (i)Appearance, Structure, Coverage of Hairs on Plantno hairs, glabrous inherited by family Alliaceae: no hairs, glabrous
upper side of leaf glabrous-löschen (i)no hairs on leaves upper side (blade) inherited by family Alliaceae: upper side of leaf glabrous-löschen
lower side of leaf glabrous-löschen (i)no hairs on lower side of leaf inherited by family Alliaceae: lower side of leaf glabrous-löschen
Distribution (i)region where the plant is likely to be found
Distribution (Veg. Zones): (i)acc. to Grubov 1952Khangai (i)in distribution data often named as '3'
Mongol-Daurian (i)in distribution data often named as '4'
Khobdo (i)in distribution data often named as '6'
Mongolian Altai (i)in distribution data often named as '7'
Middle Khalkha (i)in distribution data often named as '8'
East Mongolia (i)in distribution data often named as '9'
Depression of Great Lakes (i)in distribution data often named as '10'
Valley of Lakes (i)in distribution data often named as '11'
East Gobi (i)in distribution data often named as '12'
Gobi-Altai (i)in distribution data often named as '13'
Dzungarian Gobi (i)in distribution data often named as '14'
Transaltai Gobi (i)in distribution data often named as '15'
Alashan Gobi (i)in distribution data often named as '16'
acc. to: Gubanov 1996
Distribution Khangay: (i)acc. Flora Khangaya 1989VI
Plant Use
General Use:forage plant (i)this plant is known as forage plant (Johnson 2003) inherited by family Alliaceae: forage plant
medical plant inherited by family Alliaceae: medical plant
Plant Status
Endemism:subendemit: East Mongolia
acc. to: Gubanov 1996