Class:angiosperms
Group:dicotyledons
Order:Lamiales
Family:Lamiaceae
Subfamily:Lamioideae
Genus:Lagopsis
Scientific name: Lagopsis marrubiastrum (Steph.) Ik.-Gal.
Name acc. to:Gubanov 1996
Description:Whole plants densely lanate-pilose, glaucous. Leaves orbicular-reniform, on both surfaces white lanate, with scattered sessile glandules. Bracts 2-3 time shorter than calyx. Inflorescences short dense spicate. Flowers dark brown.
open map in a new windowtaxon distribution for Lagopsis marrubiastrum acc. to Geobotanical Regions of Mongolia by Grubov (1955)
Habitat:Screes, stony slopes, rocks, pebble-stony bottom of sayrs, sandy-pebble river banks, moraines up to alpine belt (Grubov 2001).

Character Data:

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Habit (i)general appearance of a plant
Water or terrestrial plant: (i)water and swamp plantsterrestrial (i)plant grows on dry land
example: Orostachys spinosa
inherited by family Lamiaceae: terrestrial
Parasite Status: (i)Is the plant autonoumously living, or a half- or full parasite?no parasite (i)plant fully autonomous
example: Ranunculus
inherited by family Lamiaceae: no parasite
Smell & Touch: (i)general appearance of the plantodor (i)plant with an obvious scent inherited by family Lamiaceae: odor
Growth form: (i)Herb, shrub or tree / water plant = terrestrialherb (i)herbaceous, erect plant, up to 2m high, mostly with a leafy shoot, if perennial, shoots die to the ground each season, shoots are not woody
example: Artemisia pectinata

Fruit (i)the seed bearing organ, with or without adnate parts; a ripened ovary and any other structures which are attached and ripen with it. Aggregate fruits are handled like simple fruits for determination.
Consistency: (i)Fleshy fruits or dry fruits, see dispersal adaptations for further classificationdry (i)with a dry outer shell, no fleshy parts, but seed (embryo) could be edible inherited by family Lamiaceae: dry
Opening of Fruit:not opening (i)fruits remain closed at maturity and disperse with seeds inside
example: Corylus (nut), Vaccinium (berry)
inherited by family Lamiaceae: not opening
Type of Fruit: (i)common fruit types (including pseudocarp!?)nut or nutlet (i)dry fruit with a single, hard stone inside (and usually a large often edible embryo) inherited by family Lamiaceae: nut or nutlet
Seed number: (i)estimate the number of seeds per fruit, if recognizable seeds are in the fruit (in rare cases a fruit may contain one seeded nuts: rose hip, carex)2-6 (i)2-6 single seeds, well recognizable
example: Crataegus: few-seeded berry
inherited by family Lamiaceae: 2-6
Splitting of Fruit: (i)Is the fruit splitting into parts? Attention: Fruit != Seedin 4 parts inherited by family Lamiaceae: in 4 parts
Flower (i)reproductive portion of the plant, consisting of sepals, petals, stamens, and pistils
Flower appearance and pollination: (i)general appearance of the flowerattractive, animal-pollinated (i)attractive and coloured flowers, mostly large, attracting surely animals
example: Trollius, Rosa, Chamaerhodos
inherited by family Lamiaceae: attractive, animal-pollinated
Perianth arrangement: (i)Attention: in some plants, flowers may be dimorphic in different ways (dioecious or gynodioecious). If flowers vary, record the characters of the most showy flowers. double, different (i)two types of perianth leaves, differently coloured (sepals: outer periant leaves, usually greenish, and petals: inner perianth leaves, usually coloured)
example: Parnassia
inherited by family Lamiaceae: double, different
Flower symmetry: (i)Symmetry of the perianth leaves. Attention: to assess this character, look on sepals, petals and stamens, but neglect carpels and ovary.zygomorphic (i)one axis of symmetry, monosymmetrical flowers
example: Pedicularis, Nepeta, Viola
inherited by genus Lagopsis: zygomorphic
Form: (i)common forms of flowersbilabiate (i)petals froming two lips, flower usually zygomorphic inherited by family Lamiaceae: bilabiate
Sepal number: (i)Number of sepal leaves (outer perianth leaves, calyx leaves, mostly greenish). Attention, this character applies only for flowers separated in speals and petals, thus excluding most monocots. Be aware of the bracts (involucral leaves) of Asteraceae flowerheads, do not qualify these as sepals!5 (i)
example: Polemonium
inherited by family Lamiaceae: 5
Sepal fusion: (i)To which degree are the sepal leaves connected? Attention, this character applies only for flowers separated in speals and petals, thus excluding most monocots. Be aware of the bracts (involucral leaves) of Asteraceae flowerheads, do not qualify these as sepals!fused (i)leaves united, only tips are free
example: Fabaceae, Silene
inherited by family Lamiaceae: fused
Petal / Tepal number: (i)Number of petal leaves (inner perianth leaves, usually coloured). 5 (i)
example: Potentilla
inherited by family Lamiaceae: 5
Petal / Tepal fusion: (i)To which degree are the petal leaves connected? Petals sympetalous.fused (i)petal leaves united, only tips are free (gamopetalous, sympetalous)
example: Linnaea, Adenophora, Stellera
inherited by family Lamiaceae: fused
Spur: (i)a hollow, slender, sac-like appendage of the perianth leaves, storing nectarno spurs (i)
example: Peganum
inherited by family Lamiaceae: no spurs
Stamen number: (i)Attention: We ask for the reproductive organs of the flower dispersing pollen. Count only fully fertile stamens, not staminodia (e.g. Parnassia).4 (i)extremely rare, may be absent
example: Plantago
inherited by genus Lagopsis: 4
Stamen fusion: (i)To which degree are the stamens fused? Attention: Whereas the pollen sacs itself are often free, their stalks (filaments) may be fused. Here, we count them as fused if they are together over at least one thirth of their length.free (i)stamens with separate bases
example: Malus
inherited by family Lamiaceae: free
Pistil number: (i)number of pistils (female floral organs: style, if developed; stigma; and carpels/ovary)1 (i)one carpel, but clearly one stigma
example: Pyrola, Primula, Alyssum
inherited by family Lamiaceae: 1
Carpel fusion: (i)to which degree are the carpels (modified leaf forming simple pistil or part of a compound pistil) fuseedfused (i)carpels united into an ovary, only styles are free
example: Malus, Berberis
inherited by family Lamiaceae: fused
stigma number per style: (i)number of stigma per style2 (i)two stigmas, resulting from two fused carpels with or without develped style inherited by family Lamiaceae: 2
Ovary position: (i)for entirely or partly fused carpels, describe their position in relation to the insertion point of perianth leaves (best done by doing a longitudinal section of a flower)superior (hypogynous) (i)base of carpels attached above insertion point of perianth leaves, carpels free or fused
example: Delphinium, Anemone
inherited by family Lamiaceae: superior (hypogynous)
Sex: (i)Distribution of sexes among flowers, only cases most commonly occurringbisexual, hermaphrodite (i)all or nearly all flowers of a plant with male and female parts
example: Haplophyllum, Chenopodium
inherited by family Lamiaceae: bisexual, hermaphrodite
Inflorescence (i)flowering part of a plant, describes the arrangement of the flowers on the flowering axis
Inflorescence: (i)Structure of the inflorescenceFlowers in inflorescence (i)no solitary flowers
Appearance: (i)outer look of the inflorescenceterminal (i)inflorescence is the highest point of the plant and may consist of a single flower only
example: Cypripedium, Rhaponticum, Ligularia sibirica, Echinops
inherited by genus Lagopsis: terminal
Type: (i)Types of inflorescence. Attention: We here ask for the botanical nomenclature of inflorescences, which is sufficiently complicated. Tick only, if you are certain, or tick all inflorescence types that appear similar of these of the plant in question.Spike (i)all flowers sessile and crowded along a main axis, there may be several spikes on a shoot
example: Plantago, Carex vesicaria, Vicia, Typha (spadix)
inherited by genus Lagopsis: Spike
Leaf (i)expanded, usually photosynthetic organ of a plant (including phylloclades)
Leaf development: (i)structure and development of leaveswith leaves (i)plant with green leaves inherited by family Lamiaceae: with leaves
Arrangement: (i)arrangement of leaves at the stemopposite, opposite-decussate (i)two leaves per node
example: Phlomis
inherited by family Lamiaceae: opposite, opposite-decussate
Division: (i)Blade of the leaf entire or (more or less) deeply dissected. Attention: There are various appearances of the leaf margin (from entire to toothed and lobed). Here, we ignore this and ask only for dissections that separate the leaf for more than one third of its length or width, whatever is smaller. Sometimes, it is difficult to tell apart compound leaves from a shoot system with simple leaves: look for stipulae and/or axillary buds at the ground of the leaves: if only some possess these structures, the others are most likely leaflets of a compound leaf.simple (i)non-divided leaf, but margin may be incised nearly to the ground
palmatisected (i)leaf deeply (more than half of leaf lamina) divied into more than three parts
example: Trifolium lupinaster
inherited by genus Lagopsis: palmatisected
Shape: (i)General shape of leaf or leaflet in compound leaves. Always check the ground for largest leaves of a plant. To be worked out: how to handle pinnate leaves?round to orbicular (i)leaf at least as broad as long
example: Pyrola rotundifolia, Caltha
inherited by genus Lagopsis: round to orbicular
Margin: (i)Structure of leaf margin (or that of a leaflet in case of compound leaves). Attention: Here we ask for the leaf margin, defined as all those dissections that separate the leaf for less than one third of its length or width, whatever is smaller. To be worked out: how to handle margin of pinnate leaves?lobed/ crenulate (i)Leaf margin deeply crenulate. be aware of deeply lobed leaves, these count as palmatisected, see character: leaf division.
example: Crataegus, Dryas, Rubus humulifolius

Apex: (i)Appearance of the tip of leaf resp. leaflets in compound leaves.emarginate (i)with a notch at the apex
example: Potentilla bifurca

Veination: (i)arrangment of the main veins of a leafpinnate (i)one main, several side veins
example: Cicerbita
inherited by family Lamiaceae: pinnate
Petiole: (i)length of the leaf stalk (petiole) in relation to the leafwith (i)leaves with petiole (stalk) inherited by genus Lagopsis: with
longer than lamina (i)petiole longer than lamina
Stipule: (i)leaflets at the base of the petiole, these are smaller and of different shapenone (i)without stipules
example: Euphorbia, Ericaceae s.l.
inherited by family Lamiaceae: none
Leaf colour lower side: (i)Shades of green on the leaf, lower sidegrayish (i)grayish in colour due to hairs or a thick cuticula
example: Atriplex cana

Leaf colour upper side: (i)Shades of green on the leaf, upper sidegrayish (i)grayish in colour due to hairs or a thick cuticula
Root / shoot below ground (i)plant part below ground (in most cases), including below ground shoots, without leaves
Root type: (i)Organisation of the rootsallorhizous (i)plant with a conspicuous tap root, one larger tap root with side roots
example: Dicotyledonae
inherited by class: allorhizous
Hairs
Hairs : (i)Appearance, Structure, Coverage of Hairs on PlantHairs on fruits
has hairs inherited by genus Lagopsis: has hairs
coverage: dense (i)hairs reach each other if bent together
example: Ptilotrichum canescens

on stem/shoot (i)has hairs on stem/shoot inherited by genus Lagopsis: on stem/shoot
leaf upper side (i)has hairs on leaves upper side (blade)
on flower (i)has hairs on flower
coverage: dense (i)hairs reach each other if bent together
example: Papaver

leaf lower side
structure: glands (i)glands (plant appears sticky)
example: Cerastium glutinosum

structure: glands (i)glands (plant appears sticky)
example: Thalictrum foetidum

coverage: dense (i)hairs reach each other if bent together
example: Stellaria dichotoma
inherited by genus Lagopsis: coverage: dense
coverage: villose (i)hairs like a fur covering most of the surface
example: Lagopsis neodarwiniana
inherited by genus Lagopsis: coverage: villose
Distribution (i)region where the plant is likely to be found
Distribution (Veg. Zones): (i)acc. to Grubov 1952Khangai (i)in distribution data often named as '3'
Khobdo (i)in distribution data often named as '6'
Mongolian Altai (i)in distribution data often named as '7'
Gobi-Altai (i)in distribution data often named as '13'
Dzungarian Gobi (i)in distribution data often named as '14'
acc. to: Gubanov 1996
Distribution Khangay: (i)acc. Flora Khangaya 1989III
V
VI
Plant Use
General Use:other inherited by family Lamiaceae: other